Pets do not usually present a problem when adopting or fostering, unless they are known to be dangerous

07/12/2014 12:00am

 

Pets do not usually present a problem when adopting or fostering, unless they are known to be dangerous
This includes certain breeds of dogs, which are known to have injured or killed a child. If you own a dog or other pet considered to be dangerous, agencies will need to know how you would control it, and how you would keep a child safe. 
For many children, pets are a source of support, helping to build their trust and confidence. However, some children are fearful of animals or may have allergies or sensitivities to some types of pet hair. In these instances, placing a child in a household with some animals may not be suitable.
Some of our foster carers live on a farm where there are a range of animals, some have horses and some just have small pets such as hamsters. Animals help children to relax and we just need to make sure there is no risk either from your pet to a child or the other way around!
Applications to foster will not be considered from anyone who owns any breed of dog that is registered or required to be registered under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991/1997. These are:-
•Pit Bull Terriers
•Japanese Tosa
•Dogo Argentines
•Fila Brazillieros
A safety assessment of all dogs in applicants' homes will be carried out. Special caution will need to be taken when assessing households containing an Alsatian/German Shepherd, Rottweiler, Doberman, Bulldog or more than two dogs of any breed, as these have been identified by the RSPCA as breeds with a tendency and capacity for aggressiveness.

Pets do not usually present a problem when adopting or fostering, unless they are known to be dangerous

This includes certain breeds of dogs, which are known to have injured or killed a child. If you own a dog or other pet considered to be dangerous, agencies will need to know how you would control it, and how you would keep a child safe. 

For many children, pets are a source of support, helping to build their trust and confidence. However, some children are fearful of animals or may have allergies or sensitivities to some types of pet hair. In these instances, placing a child in a household with some animals may not be suitable.

Some of our foster carers live on a farm where there are a range of animals, some have horses and some just have small pets such as hamsters. Animals help children to relax and we just need to make sure there is no risk either from your pet to a child or the other way around!

Applications to foster will not be considered from anyone who owns any breed of dog that is registered or required to be registered under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991/1997. These are:-

•Pit Bull Terriers

•Japanese Tosa

•Dogo Argentines

•Fila Brazillieros

A safety assessment of all dogs in applicants' homes will be carried out. Special caution will need to be taken when assessing households containing an Alsatian/German Shepherd, Rottweiler, Doberman, Bulldog or more than two dogs of any breed, as these have been identified by the RSPCA as breeds with a tendency and capacity for aggressiveness.